Server 2012 – Force a Network Type with PowerShell

Here’s an annoying one that I run into quite frequently. On Windows Server 2012, it appears there’s not a quick and easy way to change the network type for a network connection other than to use PowerShell. The problem that I typically run into, is that firewall rules for a specific program are only set for the “domain” profile, so here’s how to force the network type on some interface. This is just for my own personal reference, but I took this info directly from here. Continue reading “Server 2012 – Force a Network Type with PowerShell”

Batch Script – How to Check if the Current User is a Member of a Group

Here is a batch script, using only DOS commands, to check if the current user is a member of a specific group. The way it is currently written, you can call a batch file containing this code using the CALL command and pass the short NetBIOS domain name (or possibly the computer name if it is a local account) and the group name to search for as arguments, and it will return a “1” if the user is a member of the specified group and “0” if they are not. Just be sure to put quotes around any group name that contains any spaces. Continue reading “Batch Script – How to Check if the Current User is a Member of a Group”

Ultra VNC – Send Custom Keys Workaround and ASCII Reference Chart

Unfortunately, not only is the option considered experimental, but the Ultra VNC documentation on how to “Send Custom Keys” is less than ideal, and remembering the decimal equivalent of each key on the keyboard is simply not an option for me. I currently have no want or need to know this information by heart, so I’m not even going to attempt to do so. So, when desperate times call for desperate measures, it’s time to start thinking on your feet and stop pouting like a little man-girl, you’ve still got options.

Luckily, if your running any newer version of Windows (I guess if you want to call it luck), your a slug-headed loser douche extraordinaire (present company included, I just wish the Linux desktop environments weren’t so damn slow) that doesn’t care about his or her right to computer privacy…Wait, I mean, luckily, you can use the On-Screen Keyboard as a workaround for this and you can send whatever custom key combinations you need. Continue reading “Ultra VNC – Send Custom Keys Workaround and ASCII Reference Chart”

Auto Logon to a Workstation on a Windows Domain

There are hundreds of articles on this subject, so I’m not going to spend any time on this. This is just for my own personal reference in the future.

Navigate to the following registry key:

HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon

Create/Edit the following keys as string values:

DefaultUserName
DefaultPassword
DefaultDomainName

Find the key “AutoAdminLogon” and set the value to “1”.

Mac OS X – Export Google Chrome Browsing History to CSV File from the Terminal

This post is just for my own personal reference, but you can use it too if you like. Just make sure to change the “UserName” below to whatever that user’s home directory is. I’ve mashed the code together from the following sources, changed it to export in csv format (making it easier to import into Excel or Open Office for further manipulation), made it into a one-liner for sake of ease, put the data in ascending order based on last URL visit date, and converted the dates into human readable format. Continue reading “Mac OS X – Export Google Chrome Browsing History to CSV File from the Terminal”

HP Support Assistant – The Epitome of Spyware and How to Disable It

Sure there are several legitmate cases where the HP Support Assistant can be helpful, such as updating drivers or flashing the BIOS on the computer, but if you’re reading this, you’ve probably already established the fact that the software basically hijacks your computer and does a lot of shady shit in the background. I would absolutely classify the product as being spyware and would highly recommend that you take all steps necessary to disable it when it is not being used, and here are some reasons why.

My first problem is that by default, the HP Support Assistant does an intrusive scan of your network to search for “devices” every time the software runs and it appears you can’t turn that off. It doesn’t get much shadier than that folks, seeing as how you don’t really know what they are up to and why they are taking an inventory of your entire network.
Continue reading “HP Support Assistant – The Epitome of Spyware and How to Disable It”

Bash Script – Move Files into Subdirectories Based on Modified Date – OR – Moving Ntop Netflow Dumps into Subdirectories by Date

In a busy network environment, it is critical to have some form of network monitoring on all your servers and equipment. Network monitoring comes in many different forms and flavors, whether it be to monitor critical system services and applications via SNMP, WMI, or some proprietary third party software, or just generically pinging some devices to make sure they are up.

Nowadays, it is getting more and more necessary to dig deeper to be able to track what end users are doing and what websites they are visiting and this is where the Cisco Netflow comes in handy. Essentially, netflow allows us to peer down into the network traffic streams and give us vital source, destination, and protocol information coming to and from our network hosts but isn’t quite as storage intensive as doing a full fledged pcap dump, which makes historical accounting of this data a whole lot nicer.
Continue reading “Bash Script – Move Files into Subdirectories Based on Modified Date – OR – Moving Ntop Netflow Dumps into Subdirectories by Date”